Decision-making research focuses on how we deliberate over costs and benefits of our options (e.g., comparing apples & oranges)

Decision-making research focuses on how we deliberate over the costs and benefits of our options (e.g., comparing apples and oranges)
 

Cognitive control research focuses on how we exert cognitive effort to overcome our automatic biases (e.g., naming the color a word appears in vs. reading the word itself)
 

Cognitive control research focuses on how we exert cognitive effort to overcome our automatic biases (e.g., naming the color a word appears in rather than reading the word itself)

We are interested in answering questions about the intersection between these processes:


How do automatic processes interact with our cost-benefit analyses?
How is our decision process influenced by the presence of automatic biases, like habits, impulses, and defaults? (e.g., Shenhav & Greene, 2014; Shenhav et al., 2014)
How do self-control conflicts unfold over time?
 


What are the motivational barriers to exerting control?
What makes choosing difficult? (e.g., Shenhav & Buckner, 2014)
What are downstream consequences of control costs? (e.g., Shenhav, Rand, Greene, 2012)
How can we reduce the costs of control?
How are cognitive and physical effort related?



How do we choose to overcome these barriers?
How do we decide what kind(s) and how much control to allocate? (e.g., Shenhav, Botvinick, Cohen, 2013)
What is the basis for cognitive effort dynamics (e.g., fatigue, depletion)? 
What are the mechanisms for cognitive perseverance?